Crowtrees

Crowtrees pre 1864
Title Crowtrees
Date Pre 1864
Location Rawdon
Photo ID E014
Comment The original house has two separate date stones on it, 1625 to the rear and 1670 in front and also the initials ‘C.C.’ The Rev. Samuel Cotes, a dissenting minister who had been ejected from his parish of West Bridgeford, near Nottingham, returned to the house, his family home, in 1662 which apparently he extended. He died, aged 67 in 1684, when the Rev. Oliver Heywood attended his funeral.

The house was occupied by Timothy Cooper, a Quaker, in the early 18th century and ultimately came into the possession of Richard Hird. The existing outbuildings to the rear appear to be late 18th century. Before Leeds Road was made the ‘Co-op. Triangle’ formed part of the estate, as did lands as far as Harrogate Road and the Pease Hill footpath.
It became an Inn in 1830, at the end of a long uphill pull from Kirkstall, being kept in the mid-19th century by the Harper family. J.V. Godwin bought it about 1870, demolished it, rebuilding it as a house in a similar 17th century style and reusing much of the original stone. This gives it the appearance of being older than it is in fact. The very impressive curtain wall to Leeds Road was built at the same time. He lived there and was succeeded by his son, Sir Arthur, and later by Heaton Naylor of the Green Lane dyeworks. For a while it was a Leeds Council old persons home but is again a private house.

Crowtrees 1865/70

E020 – Crowtrees, 1865/70.

Crowtrees – 1865/70

Looking across a field to Crowtrees Inn which is in the centre, the view continues to Little London.
On the right is Micklefield House.

Crowtrees 1865/70

E021 – Crowtrees, 1865/70.

Crowtrees – 1865/70

Crowtrees Undated

E011 – Crowtrees, Undated.

Crowtrees – Undated

A view of Crowtrees

Crowtrees Undated

E012 – Crowtrees, Undated.

Crowtrees – Undated

Thomas Harper, a farmer of Esholt was the landlord about 1838, assisted by his son Charles and granddaughter Mary Harper who acted as a servant. At some point it seems that the Inn was divided into two. On the 1861 Census both sides were occupied by the Harper family, the landlord then was henry Harper.

Crowtrees Undated

A087 – Crowtrees, Undated.

Crowtrees – Undated

Showing the main entrance to the house.

Returning to a family home it was known to have been home to the Coates family and later the Naylor family , Heaton Naylor of the Green Lane Dye Works.

Crowtrees Undated

A086 – Crowtrees, Undated.

Crowtrees – Undated

Could this photograph show the Naylor Family?

Crowtrees Undated

A088 – Crowtrees, Undated.

Crowtrees – Undated

Front elevation of the house with steps down onto the lawn area.

Crowtrees Park 1932

BB018 – Crowtrees Park, 1932.

Crowtrees Park – 1932

Looking up Crow Trees Park from Leeds Road.
A finger post on the left points to various parts of the district, the wall on the right has a notice which reads :”Bus Stop Horsforth Leeds”
Over time some of Crowtrees estate was sold and developed, Crowtrees Park was developed in the early 20’s by Leonard Rigg of the butchering family.

Crowtrees 1968

J438 – Crowtrees, 1968.

Crowtrees – 1968

February 1968, the photo was titled “Dog and cat at Crowtrees”

Photographer Bryan Waite, donated by his family.

Crowtrees Undated

J17 – Crowtrees, Undated.

Crowtrees – Undated

No date however, a more modern colour photograph, still showing the steps from the front elevation down onto the lawn.

Previous Comments:

Wego
I was very excited to see these photos as Thomas Harper, the landlord and farmer, was my Great, Great, Great Grandfather.
16 November 2014.

Re A86, A87, & A88.
smbork
I wonder if anyone remembers the generosity of the Naylor family who had a wonderful Brownie and Guide hut built in the grounds. It was like a tree house….magic… and the lending of their private tennis court to Rawdon Youth club in the 50s. Some great memories there.
09 July 2015.

Re A86, A87, & A88.
valryan85a
I too remember the lovely Brownie Hut at the back. I used to go there in 1950s. I lived on Larkfield Ave, and we used to cut down through Brownies Wood (where allotments are) climb over a fence to the Brownie Hut. It was a magical place and I can remember Brown Owl and Tawny Owl and the huge red toadstool with white spots! I was a sprite!
13 December 2018.

Re J438
Richard Schmidt
The good looking Jack Russell there is called Seamus, owned by the Matron at Crowtrees -Jessie Mitchell. My Gran.x

jean dean
Crowtrees House on the A65 Rawdon, quite near the bottom of Over Lane, used to be an Old Inn, then a private house and then a nursing home. Eventually it was sold, probabably by the Aireborough council and then it became a home for retired ladies , there are now some retirement bungalows in part of the grounds.
16 August 2017.

adminCWAB1
For a number or years in the late 1960’s and through to 1977, when the Jubilee Hall was opened in Layton Avenue (Back Lane). The girl guides / brownies used to meet in a building in the grounds of Crowtrees. I can remember my sister Louise coming home one evening and announcing that the brownies would be finishing, because the then leader was stepping down. Louise persuaded our mother Kathleen Willcock to get back in to girl guide movement and thus rekindled along association with the Girl Guides in Rawdon.
17 August 2017.

Consolidated by Elaine Ellwood. 07 April 2021.
Last updated: 19 April 2021.

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