Mount Pleasant

Mount Pleasant 1960s

Title Mount Pleasant
Date 1960s
Location Guiseley
Photo ID H210
Comment This image of a wash house to the rear of the property was donated by Jack and Pat Halliday who told us “Pat’s parents lives at 3 Mount Pleasant, her father Eddie Armitage took this photo. He was a member of Aireborough Camera Club”. A traditional peggy or wash tub is on the left. The sink has a cold water tap. Water could be heated in the set-pot or copper on the right. Photographer Eddie Armitage, donated by Jack and Pat Halliday.
Mount Pleasant 1960s

H211 – Mount pleasant, 1960s.

Mount Pleasant – 1960s

Exterior view showing the wash house to the rear of the property.

Mount Pleasant 1960s

H256 – Mount pleasant, 1960s.

Mount Pleasant – 1960s

Three views along the back of Mount Pleasant.

Mount Pleasant 1960s

H257 – Mount pleasant, 1960s.

Mount Pleasant – 1960s

As above.

Mount Pleasant 1960s

H258 – Mount pleasant, 1960s.

Mount Pleasant – 1960s

As above.

Mount Pleasant 1960s

X58 – Mount pleasant, c1960s.

Mount Pleasant – c1960s

Pleasant is a terrace of stone houses situated at the top of Town Street.
Middle: 11 Mount Pleasant, Guiseley.
Stone houses which are part of Mount Pleasant.

Mount Pleasant 1970s

X59- Mount pleasant, c1970s.

Mount Pleasant – c1970s

Mount Pleasant is a terrace of stone houses off Town Street (Moor Lane). Many were occupied by hand loom weavers. The long gardens behind the houses were often unfenced so some could be shared to tenter cloth i.e., stretch out the cloth on hooks to dry so it would keep its shape and not shrink.
The phrase “to be on tenterhooks” comes from this process.

Mount Pleasant 1970s

X179 – Mount pleasant, c1970s.

Mount Pleasant – c1970s

Charles Busfield, founder of the Albion Dyeworks on Towngate, once lived on Mount Pleasant. It is said that he preferred to tend the hens he kept in the garden than spend time in the Dyeworks when his business was established.

Previous Comments:

jdathebowler
The houses were built sometime in the mid 1800’s. They were originally weavers cottages. The cloth was produced in the upstairs part of the house. The domestic production of cloth was soon superseded by the mass production of cloth produced in the new mills being built. The weavers lost their livelihood and had to find employment in the mills.
09 January 2014.

Consolidated by Linda Plonka. 28 February 2022.
Last updated: 01 March 2022.

Leave a comment