Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, 1766 – 1970

Wesleyaan Methodist Chapels 1892

Title Wesleyan Methodist Chapels
Date 1892
Location Yeadon
Photo ID Scan5133
Comment This was the first Wesleyan chapel in Yeadon, it was built in 1766 by Jeremiah Marshall of Parkgate, Guiseley. The bell tower can be seen on the roof. The Chapel was sold in 1854 to W.B. Crompton Stansfield of Esholt who gave permission for it to be used as a mission hall and school by the Church of England. In 1891 St. Andrew’s Church was built and this building was then called “Old St. Andrew’s”. It was demolished and replaced by the Church Institute in 1894 which was converted into apartments in 1984.
Wesleyan Methodist Chapels Undated

K075 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, Undated.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – Undated

Situated on Chapel Hill, it was built in 1834.
The chapel was the scene of near rioting when a schism occurred between the different Methodist factions.
As a result the reformers went on to build the chapel on the High Street which later became the Lecture Hall when Queen Street Chapel was built  for the United Methodist Reformed Church.

All the different Methodist churches came together in 1932 when the Methodist Union took place but it was some time before the Yeadon branches merged.
The chapel seen here was demolished in 1958, the present Methodist Church was built in front of the site of this old chapel.

Donated by Edith & Roger Pratt.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels Undated

R386 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, Undated.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – Undated

On the left is what was the first Wesleyan Chapel to be built in Yeadon, erected in 1766 by Jeremiah Marshall of Parkgate House, Guiseley.

On the roof is a bell tower to summon the faithful.

The chapel was sold in 1854, the larger chapel having been built on Chapel Hill in 1834, it was bought by W R Crompton Stansfield of Esholt Hall who gave permission for the chapel to be used as a Church of England Mission Hall and school.

In 1891, St. Andrew’s Church was built and the chapel became known as “old St. Andrew’s”.

It was demolished and replaced on the same site by the Church Institute in 1894 which is seen on the right, it was converted into apartments in 1984 so remains one of the few old Yeadon landmarks.

Photographer of the image on the right, Edwy Harling.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels Undated

R387 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, Undated.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – Undated

Located on Chapel Hill and built in 1834, this Wesleyan Methodist Chapel was one the scene of rioting and bitter division.

A schism occurred between the different Methodist factions which led to violent disagreements in the chapel, as a result the reformers left and built a chapel on the High Street in 1855.

Their followers grew in number and it became necessary to erect an even larger chapel which was Queen Street or the United Methodist Reform Church opened in 1865, the High Street premises became the Lecture Hall and schoolroom. 

All the various divisions of the Methodist Church came together in 1932 when the Methodist Union took place but it was some time before the Yeadon branches merged. The chapel seen here was demolished in 1958, the present Methodist Church on the right was built to replace it. In the foreground is the old chapel burial ground, the monuments were removed and the area grassed over .

Between this and the present chapel is a car park which was the site of the old chapel, the right side of the present church was the old Wesleyan schoolroom.

Photographer of the image on the right, Edwy Harling.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels Undated

E476 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, Undated.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – Undated

Built in 1766, it was the first Wesleyan Chapel in Yeadon, it was demolished in 1894 and the Church Institute built on the site.

This building was converted into apartments in 1984, when a time capsule was found containing this image.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels Undated

K292 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, Undated.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – Undated

The chapel was located on Chapel Hill, it was demolished in 1958 and the burial ground was grassed over.
It was replaced by the present Methodist Church which is in the same location.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels 1925

M217A – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, 1925.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – 1925

The names of this group are noted but not in order, they were: Jessie Lucas, Ivy Stock, Elsie Fell, Edith Hudson, Edna Sample, Elsie Robinson, Nancy, Mary and Jim Brown, Edith, Elsie and Gladys Parker, Carrie Child, Annie Emmot, Margaret Jenkinson.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels 1929

C117 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, 1929.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – 1929

This group of boys has been named.
Back Row left to right: Ashley Waite (emigrated to Australia), Leslie Sessions, Dennis Waite, Archie Marshall (had a fish shop on Ivegate).
Middle Row, left to right: Albert Tate, Stanley Parker (emigrated to Australia), Eric Roo, Isaac Kitchen.
Front Row, left to right: Fred Hudson (played the Dame in Yeadon pantomimes), Herbert West (killed in action).
Frank Richardson (killed in action), Jack Brown.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels 1933

C034 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, 1933.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – 1933

A circuit rally which took place in the Wesleyan Methodist Sunday School on Chapel Hill. Seated in the front row are Reverend Dinsdale Young and Reverend Rider.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels 1936

W272 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, 1936.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – 1936

A “field day” held by the Wesleyan Methodists who worshipped at the chapel on Chapel Hill.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels 1955

G028 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, 1955.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – 1955

A side view of the chapel which was situated on Chapel Hill.
Land for a burial ground had been purchased in 1825 with the first internment taking place in 1827.
The chapel was built in 1834 and demolished in 1955.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels 1955

G029 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, 1955.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – 1955

Rear view of the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel situated on Chapel Hill, it was demolished soon after 1955.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels 1955

G073 – Wesleyan Methodist Chapels, 1955.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapels – 1955

This chapel stood on Chapel Hill, built in 1834, the last service took place on July 3rd 1955.
The congregation then went to worship at Queen Street Chapel until a replacement was built almost on the same site as the old chapel.
Queen Street was also pulled down, all the Methodists were united and attended the new chapel which is now the only Methodist Church in Yeadon (November 2012)

Previous Comments:

A comment on our facebook:
Re K292
Simon Crabtree: May I comment on this, is the building on the left the scout building and the roof in the back ground the Methodist church. If so the graves have long gone and so has the grass I think it’s a car park now.

A reply from our President:
What he says is correct in that the building just visible with its roof is our current Sanctuary which originally was the Church Hall for the Wesleyan chapel which is shown.
The site of this is the current health centre car park.
The graves were covered over and are under the grassy area.
We sold it to A.U.D. I think for about £1, the condition that as an open space it could be used for activities for Scouts Guides etc, and in addition for community events such as the Yeadon Carnival which was held on it after the usual procession.
We thought originally about removing the graves in order to sell it as building land but there are approximately 1200 bodies there and it was going to cost £12 per body to remove them, hence we thought better and is why we took the decision to pass it to the Council.
Gerald Long.
President AHS.
September 2017.

Re C117
Goose57
Isaac Kitchen was my father’s cousin. He fought in the Far East during the second world war where he was taken prisoner by the Japanese and treated very badly. On return to England he was severely emaciated and frail. In later life he was the landlord of the ‘Oddfellows Pub’ (which I think is now called The Rag and Louse’) at Yeadon.
17 February 2013.

teleg
My father used to send me to Archie Marshall’s Fruit shop on Saturday night to ask if he had any specked fruit for a penny and he used to say here’s a bagful lad when I got it home my mother would cut out the bad bits and hand it to my bothers and me that was all the fruit we got for the week, that was in the 30’s by the way,
I wondered what had happened to Frank Richardson whom I knew from school days but I am sorry to hear that he was killed during the war. I do remember Herbert West being killed. I remember Fred Hudson as the ‘dame’ in the pantomime and both Albert Tate and Isaac Kitchen were my contemporaries.
27 June 2013.

Consolidated by Jack Brayshaw. 26 January 2022.
Last updated: 26 January 2022.

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